Suggested Activities

Summer Challenge Activities To LEVEL UP

Grades K-5 Top 10 Activities:

  1. Take a hike and identify plants and animals. Find out more about the plants you find on ScienceFlix!
  2. Cook a new recipe with your family. Download a cookbook to find a fun recipe! 
  3. Draw with sidewalk chalk. Find inspiration from Simon in the Land of Chalk Drawings!
  4. Download music from Freegal and have a dance party.
  5. Plan a storytime for your family, or watch one on Virtually Anywhere.
  6. Make slime! Find out how with this eBook available to download from Hoopla.
  7. Paint a pet rock. Be inspired by this eBook available to download from Hoopla.
  8. Do a science experiment. Check out some fun experiments from the Discovery Children's Museum!
  9. Build a bird feeder. Get plans in this eBook available to download from Hoopla.
  10. Have a paper airplane contest. Fold your own and watch them fly with this eBook

Grades 6-12 Top 10 Activities:

  1. Try yoga. Watch Shanti Generation - Yoga Skills for Youth Peacemaker on Hoopla.
  2. Write a haiku. Learn more about Haiku on Explora.
  3. Learn a new language on Rosetta Stone.
  4. Listen to an audiobook while reading the actual book.
  5. Watch a how-to video on Creativebug and create something!
  6. Try to name constellations in your backyard. Find out more about the Night Sky in this eBook.
  7. Watch a movie you loved as a kid; BONUS: use the library’s resource Hoopla if you don’t own it!
  8. Have a game night! For DnD fans, there are free downloadable materials to play at home.
  9. Keep a summer journal. Find out more about journaling in this eBook!
  10. Plant a mini-garden. Learn more about the plants you've chosen in this eBook!

Children Ages 5 and Under Activities:
Parents: These are suggestions to get you started. You know your child best. Choose activities that you think they’ll enjoy doing with you.

READ

Reading together is the single most important way you can help prepare your child to read. Starting from birth, shared reading increases vocabulary and general knowledge while helping children develop an interest in reading. Children who enjoy being read to are more likely to want to learn to read themselves.

  • Read a new board book or reread a favorite but find new things on each page.
  • Read a classic picture book, check one out using Hoopla or Overdrive at LVCCLD.org.
  • Learn a new rhyme.

PLAY

Children learn about language through play. Children think symbolically when they play, which helps them to understand that spoken and written words can stand for real objects and experiences. Play also helps children to express themselves and put thoughts into words.

  • Play together at home!
    • Make a tent with your child! Cover two sturdy chairs with a blanket or towel and invite them to come inside. Make it a special place for games like playing “Peekaboo” or bringing special tent toys inside to play with. Name the special place together! (from Vroom.org)
    • Sock Puppets Sorting the laundry? Encourage your child to help you find all of the socks and make a pile of them. Pick a sock and pretend it is a puppet looking for its matching friend. Celebrate when you find a match. Then let them take a turn as the puppet. (from Vroom.org)
    • Pretend to be a librarian at home. Put away your books, do a storytime together!

SING

Songs are a wonderful way for children to learn about language. Singing also slows down language so children can hear the different sounds that make up words. This helps children when they begin to read printed language. Sing songs and play music for your child.

  • Sing, Rhyme, Repeat! Help your child recognize patterns and familiar words by singing simple songs with lots of repetition or rhymes. Can’t remember one? Make up your own! Encourage them to join in by repeating the words or by adding their own ideas. (from Vroom.org)
  • Check out free storytime songs on Freegal from the library’s eResources.
  • Sing the ABC song.

TALK

Children learn language and other early literacy skills by listening to adults talk. As children listen to spoken language, they learn new words and what they mean while gaining important general knowledge about the world around them. This knowledge will help children understand the meaning of what they read.

  • Show off your favorite finger play exercise.
  • Rhyme Zone! You can play this rhyming game anywhere, anytime. Think of a fun word, then let your child think of another word that rhymes with it. Take turns and keep going back and forth as long as you can! Plan? Fan? Ran? (from Vroom.org)
  • Identify shapes while out for a drive.

WRITE

Reading and writing go hand in hand. Both represent spoken language and communicate information. Children can learn pre-reading skills by participating in writing activities like scribbling, drawing, and forming letters. Keep paper and crayons or markers on a table that children can access easily.

  • Work on a craft.
  • Identify your colors. Try mixing them to see what happens!
  • Make scribble monster drawings.
Print this page